Archive for the ‘Tsilhqot’in’ Tag

Adding context; erasing deficits

IMG_0373My mind suffers from a “history deficit”.

The historical context of many events that are happening in Canadian society  is unknown to me, and I am grateful to those who offer lessons that expand my reality. One of the wonderful lessons is in the following post abut the Supreme Court’s recent decision on the Tsilhqot’in decision.

Ian Gill has published a blogpost that provided me with new insights on the context. For example, he writes:

“The Tsilhqot’in people had a history of bucking convention that stretched back to one of the great moments of resistance in B.C. history, the so-called Chilcotin War of 1864. Then, an attempt to build a road from Bute Inlet up to the Cariboo goldfields was brought to an abrupt and bloody end when several members of the road crew were killed; in retribution, six Tsilhqot’in men were arrested, tried and eventually hanged, even though they were later proven not to have taken part in the original war party.”

The full post, which helped me to reduce my “history deficit”, is available at: http://thetyee.ca/Opinion/2014/07/26/Tsilhqotin-With-Gloves/?utm_source=daily&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=260714

 

Tsilhqot’in Decision: Time to Grow up, Canada

In June, 2014 the Supreme Court of Canada reached a decision that will have immediate and far-reaching implications for the relationship of First Nations peoples and settlers in the land called Canada.

Like Rafe Mair, I grew up, and was educated in an anthropocentric worldview. Part of that worldview was our relationship with “the Indians”, who I now recognize as First Nations peoples. It has been quite a journey for me, as it has for Rafe Mair, whose reflection on this journey begins as follows:

IroquoisHiawatha_600px.jpg

Schoolbook depiction of Iroquois society: growing up in Kamloops, a white child learned about some eastern First Nations but virtually nothing about those in B.C.

The Tsilhqot’in (Roger William*) case is a game changer.

There is aboriginal title and it does not depend, as our title to our houses does, upon the Crown but is totally independent of Crown interests. Moreover — and this is perhaps of more immediate concern — no longer are developers just required to consult with First Nations in proposing development, they must get consent.

There will be, of course, more cases but they’ll be by way of explanatory rather than breaking the new ground. No doubt other First Nations will want to define their rights and there may be actions by developers with respect to their proposals. At the same time, because of William, one can expect governments to be much more in the mood to settle, especially since First Nations seem incapable of losing in the Supreme Court of Canada!

The full story is at: http://thetyee.ca/Opinion/2014/07/07/Tsilhqotin-Decision/